Carter Sampson's fourth full-length album Wilder Side is a soulful and soft country masterpiece.  The Oklahoma City singer-songwriter has a penchant for penning songs that don't need bluster or bombast to tell a powerful story.  Focusing on themes of heartbreak and the open road, Wilder Side is the kind of pure country record that has far more in common with classic releases from the likes of Patsy Cline and Emmylou Harris than it does with anything one will find on country radio.  Fellow Oklahoma artists Ali Harter and John Moreland made appearances on the record lending their distinctive voices, perfectly complementing Sampson's beautifully sorrowful vocals.  And that more than anything is what drives this record, Sampson's breathtaking voice.  This record is haunting and mesmerizing and simply beautiful.”

Oklahoma Lefty Blogspot

Artist: Carter SampsonAlbum: Wilder SideWebsite: http://cartersampson.netGenre: Country/FolkSounds Like: Patty Griffin, Lucinda WilliamsTechnical Grade: 10/10Production/Musicianship Grade: 10/10Commercial Value: 10/10Overall Talent Level: 10/10Songwriting Skills: 10/10Performance Skill: 10/10Best Songs: Wilder Side, Highway Rider, Medicine RiverCD Review: “Wilder Side” is Carter Sampson’s fourth full-length album. The self-penned “Queen of Oklahoma” has won a lot of awards over the years (check out the list on her website); now, I’m not one to measure an artist by their awards, but after listening to this album, I think she is well-deserving of such prizes. Based on the fact that she performs over 200 shows per year, she obviously loves her craft. And it shows!From the opening note of the title track “Wilder Side”, I instantly started to tap my foot, and the smile on my face just grew and grew, as I resonated with the words I was hearing. And I have been humming and singing this piece since.Her vocals have a rich, warm tone, with shots of power thrown in at the right moments; pleasantly smooth and heartfelt. The sound of her guitar has a country twang, which makes me want to put my cowboy boots on, get behind the wheel of my car, my guitar in the back seat (of course!), and drive off to anywhere that is open and free. But all the while, this little road trip is littered and dotted with slices of life, love, and what makes us feel alive.Her lyrics are poignant. They compel you to lean in and listen, as if to say, “tell me more.” There are quite a few clever lines in these tunes that made me chuckle at times. “C’est la vie till I die”; “Time is money, and I got nothing but time” (both from “Highway Rider”).Carter Sampson's “Wilder Side” is aptly titled – it feels like a deep-driven wild spirit, which is patiently and effectively expressed. The longing for open road and freedom with the need for life and love thrown in -- the need to live and love and be free-spirited all in one. I have a feeling this will be on my playlist for a long, long while. And Carter Sampson's "reach" is going to be huge, if it isn’t already.” - Anastasia K

The Muse's Muse

- The words of Carter Sampson are sharp, scenes clear and characters that seem very familiar to those walking between the devils and angels hanging out on your own shoulders. She delivers her tales on the soft roll of Tulsa rhythms on her recent release, Wilder Side. Carter was backed in her Oklahoma Room performance by John Calvin Abbey, and on her album with an equally stellar cast of musicians from the Tulsa area including John Moreland on vocals, and Travis Linville engineering Wilder Side, picking on various strings including guitar, pedal steel, dobro, and bass, as well as handling drums and percussion.  Carter Sampson asks for “Holy Mother” to keep an eye out as ‘me and the girls are going out on the town’, asking for help from above to make sure they do not ‘go home with a guitar man, or anyone else in the band’ while she sees a horizon of dreams under an open sky in “Everything You Need” and blurs present and past into the request “Take Me Home with You’. Wilder Side shares admissions easily on the title track as it opens the album with Carter Sampson setting the standard by making her life of a traveling troubadour the norm as her lonesome heart sits in the passenger seat on late night drives as “Wild Bird” separates her from disasters at home. Carter Sampson has a knack for penning her words as mirrors, allowing the truths of her life as support within the lives of listeners, particularly those for whom the road is not an option but a default. The flap of buzzard wings are like the tire wheels slapping for a “Highway Rider” as “Run Away” finds a safe spot within a lack of funds and security and a performer gives up the stage to take a seat in the front row to watch someone else put on a show in “Devil on the Run”. - See more at: http://thealternateroot.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=4667:otr-022616&catid=208:what-s-trending&Itemid=268#sthash.VM7VVd86.dpuf” - Danny

thealternateroot.com

Daily Discovery 2/23/16 HOMETOWN: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma CURRENT LOCATION: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma AMBITIONS: To continue to become a better songwriter and performer so I can make people feel something. TURN-OFFS: Cinnamon and dinosaurs. TURN-ONS: Sprinkled cake donuts and people who are genuine. DREAM GIG: Royal Albert Hall FAVORITE LYRIC: That’s a tricky one because I have several, but “Beauty Way” by Eliza Gilkyson is one I really love. “I felt the lights on the big, big stages The fire burning in my soul I’ve had those nights when my guitar rages But it’s not something you control little darling It’s not something you control… Redtail diving for a rat on Sunset Coyote picking through the trash Oh I wish I was lying like a cat in the sun ‘Stead of working like a dog for the cash little darling I’m only working for the cash…” SONG I WISH I WROTE: “Graceland” by Paul Simon. Anything Paul has ever written really. He is a master. 5 PEOPLE I’D MOST LIKE TO HAVE DINNER WITH: Dolly Parton, Elvis, Woody Guthrie, Aretha Franklin and my grandmother Marilyn. MY FAVORITE CONCERT EXPERIENCE: My favorite listening experience was hearing Bonnie Raitt and John Prine sing “Angel from Montgomery” together in Boston, Massachusetts. It was really the first song I ever learned to play when I was 15, so seeing two of my musical heroes sing it together was magic. My favorite performance experience is winning first place at The Chris Austin Song Contest at Merlefest in 2015 and getting to perform one of the main stages. I WROTE THIS SONG BECAUSE…  I wrote “Wild Bird” when I was in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania working on some recording projects. We were on a break from the studio when I started seeing and hearing things about a major thunderstorm and tornados headed towards my hometown. I was born and raised in Oklahoma and pretty used to tornados and what they bring, but this was really the first time that I had been away from my friends and family when a major storm had hit. It was pretty scary when all I knew was that a lot of people I loved were in the path of something dangerous and there was nothing I could do about it. I stayed up late that night sitting outside of Treelady Studios writing this song and recorded it the next day.” - American Songwriter

American Songwriter

Singer/ songwriter Carter Sampson spends a lot of time rolling along the highway on her way to and from gigs. She doesn’t have or make a lot of money but likes her life just fine. Friends, family and honing her craft are important to her.  These facts fuel the themes that run through Sampson’s lyrics in this new ten track album of all original songs. Happily she keeps improving as an artist and "Wilder Side" is proof positive of that. Regardless of the title it’s Sampson’s milder side that’s most appealing.  Her lovely vocals have a gentle Okie lilt that’s at once comforting and an embodiment all that’s good about red dirt music. In both “Highway Rider” and “Tomorrow’s Light” Sampson evokes the all-American experience of driving in a vehicle with the radio on.  Home and all the warmth that suggests is part of the later song as well as “Take Me Home with You.” There’s an overarching sense of joy and optimism in these compositions even when, “I don’t know who to blame for the things I cannot change” from “Wild Bird.” With its relentless rain falling imagery it could have been written about being away during Oklahoma’s floods last year. Sampson tapped several other fine musicians to accompany her on this project with Norman’s Travis Linville among them. The impressive musical coalition is at its finest on “Run Away.”  “See the Devil Run” tunes the musician’s saw that Satan can’t stand music because it makes people happy. It’s Sampson’s spiritual side complementing all her others.” - Doug Hill

Norman Transcript

OKLAHOMA CITY – Carter Sampson’s newest record, Wilder Side, genuinely makes me sad that I no longer have a radio show. Each track is like one kick to my shin that I packed up and moved away, leaving behind one of the most important things I ever did in my life. You really don’t know what you’ve got ‘till it’s gone. And really, I’m not lamenting missing the sound of my own voice as much as I am depressed that I want to share this album with the whole world (or as large a local circle as possible), to ensure I did what I could to make sure that everyone had a chance to check it out. And love it. And buy it. And play it in their own homes. Or cars. But, for now, I guess this review will have to do. Right from the righteous opening number, the title track with a gorgeous late 70s Cali-country sound that permeates the disc, the listener is immediately hooked. The moody “Highway Rider” and sassy “Holy Mother” continue this Highway 101 classic rock sound—don’t worry hipsters, that’s not a bad word—the spiritual successors to Gram Parsons, Linda Ronstadt and the Eagles sunkissed Americana, not afraid to rock, and like a tumbleweed drifting across the Mojave, definitely not afraid to roll. With her “wide open roads and wide open sky,” the affirmative “Everything You Need” squeezes at the heart, while “Take Me Home with You” is a plaintive plea the keep that heart safe and sound. The Gospel-tinged “Tomorrow’s Night” is a celebratory mandatory mix-tape addition to any cross-country drive, something that’s only enforced by the punctuated hand-claps of the twangy neo-spiritual “See the Devil Run.” “Gather round, good people” and see what an epic album closer should sound like. With her ever evolving sound reaching a new apex, Sampson might have just released her masterpiece. Wilder Side is a brave statement of unrestrained soul in a fraudulent city driven by barren drones releasing one tight-panted time-thieving funeral dirge after another; this is the sound of joy, pain, hopefulness, fate, fear, honesty and the wind blowing through your hair as you cruise down the California coast, or, at the very least, around Lake Hefner a couple of times, if you’re a trapped local. ” - Louis Fowler

RedDirtReport.com

“Breaking hearts and highways.” In four words, a friend of Carter Sampson’s father gave a tongue-in-cheek review of her fourth studio album, Wilder Side, that actually does a better job of summarizing the project than some could churn out on an entire page. Let’s try anyway. Wilder Side is very much the story of a woman in motion. Released Jan. 12 and featuring contributions from John Moreland and producer Travis Linville, the album is Sampson’s most carefully crafted and organized release yet.   Sampson, speaking with Oklahoma Gazette the day before her album release, described herself as a restless person. Touring and recording remain the constants in her life as she travels the roads. Sampson said she loves driving, advancing — even into uncertainty. “I’ve always known that I wanted to play music, and I’ve spent time trying to figure out something else to do even for a backup, and I can’t figure out anything aside from that,” she said. Wilder Side opens with the title track, a wonderfully produced tribute to what Sampson calls her alter ego, someone she can blame when she goes out and does something stupid with her friends. Her alter ego seems to have a lot in common with what appears to be her true persona. On “Wilder Side,” the songstress claims a free, “gypsy” spirit. “I love to travel,” she said. “I think traveling is right up there with my love of music, so they go hand-in-hand.” The second track, “Highway Rider,” featuring strong accent vocals from last year’s breakout singer-songwriter Moreland, sticks with the wanderer theme. Following a breakup and a sudden moment of clarity, Sampson realized a lifelong dream and bought an RV after she turned 33. “Highway Rider” seems to echo her sudden grab at freedom on the road. “Home is where the heart is. Ain’t that a shame,” one line goes. “Because I can’t seem to keep my heart in the same place.” The song “Medicine River” is a tribute to Medicine Park in the Wichita Mountains. The place, she said, is so magical to her that the song just wouldn’t leave her. “I got mad at that song because I couldn’t go to sleep,” she said. “I kept having to get up and write it down and just couldn’t stop, which is a good problem to have, I guess.” Vibrant “See the Devil Run” is a true story about Sampson’s visit to Al Green’s Full Gospel Tabernacle in Memphis. Sampson said she grew up Methodist and always dreamed of attending church at a place that put more passion into the music. “It was everything I ever wanted out of a church service,” she said about her time there. “It was what I felt like church music should be.” Free bird Sampson’s family played a big role in molding the person she is today. Her grandmother has a master’s degree in music from the University of Oklahoma.  Her dad plays guitar and her mom has always sung in the church choir. Her parents got her hooked on folk and country acts like Emmylou Harris early on. Even Sampson’s love of the road can be attributed to her family. Her grandmother traveled the world with a friend while both were in their 70s. Sampson’s parents let her spend her 16th birthday in Rome. She would later return to Europe with a friend while still in high school.   “I’m really grateful that my parents were like, ‘Yes, go do that,’ at an early age,” she said. “I really do love to [travel]. But the touring part of traveling is exhausting. I feel like a lot of times, I don’t really get to stay and experience a place like I would like to because it’s in and out.” Recently, Sampson has toured with Erik the Viking and Joe Mack, though she said she enjoys touring solo as well. Wilder Side marks the second time she has used a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds for her project ahead of its release. In a time when people are reluctant to buy music they have not heard yet, the $10,000 Sampson raised through her recent campaign is a testament to the faith her supporters have in her abilities. The singer-songwriter said she was sorry if the recording process took longer than some of her backers anticipated, but she took great care to make sure the finished product was perfect. “I’m so happy that it went the way that it did, and I’m equally happy now that it’s done because it’s a lot of pressure too, knowing there’s 200 people backing this or wanting this or waiting for this and I owe these things to them,” she said. In light of the success artists like John Moreland have seen with brutally honest songwriting, Sampson said she wants people to find her music on this album more relatable. She’s as honest and vulnerable as ever, and she hopes fans can pick out their own memories from that. “What I think is so cool about songs is I may have written it with one thing in mind and you may hear something totally different from it,” she said, “and I love that.”  ” - Ben Luschen

Oklahoma Gazette

The “Queen of Oklahoma” boasts quite a court of friends and fans who were happy to help her unveil her “Wilder Side.” Oklahoma City singer-songwriter Carter Sampson reunited with Oklahoma musician and producer Travis Linville to create her fourth studio album, while fellow Okies John Moreland, Ali Harter, Ryan Jones, Gabriel Mor and Joe Mack made guest appearances on “Wilder Side.” “I think we got some of the dreamy tremolo guitar feel that Travis has that I really like on it,” said Sampson, who also recorded her 2008 album “Good for the Meantime” with Linville. “I knew that I wanted to work with him again, and then I got ahold of his last EP … ‘Sun or Moon.' It just has this really dreamy feel to it that I liked a whole lot — a lot of that's just Travis' tone and his mood — so I'm really glad that I did. And he played damn near every instrument on the record.” Sampson, 35, will celebrate the release of “Wilder Side,” which dropped Tuesday, on Saturday night at the Blue Door. “I really love that place. I feel really lucky and grateful that (owner) Greg Johnson has always been very encouraging of me and had me playing Woody Guthrie tributes probably before I should have been playing them,” said Carter, who filmed part of her music video for “Queen of Oklahoma,” a signature song from her 2011 album “Mockingbird Sing” at the legendary listening room. “It is such a magical building to think about all the people who have been on that stage, and it just sounds so good in there."    Recording in-house A fan of old-school country queens like Emmylou Harris, Patsy Cline and fellow Oklahoma native Reba McEntire, Sampson unleashed her “Wilder Side” during recording sessions at Linville's tiny Norman house, and the casual setting helped offset some of her general dislike for recording. “When you're in a studio and you're staring at a wall, there's nothing to really play off of. There's no audience … so there's no energy to feed off of. So, I like the fact that Travis is so laid-back. It definitely makes it more comfortable,” Sampson said over pizza Monday at Empire Slice House, just down the street from her Plaza District home. “We'd have to wait for trains to go by and planes and (there was) no vocal booth or anything like that. It was just all out in his living room.  … We're sitting on his couch and like Ali Harter came over a few times to sing backing vocals and brought her daughter. It was definitely relaxed, and I think made it easier, at least for me. Less stressful.” Flocking with Songbirds Both Sampson and Harter are counted among the Tequila Songbirds, a revolving collective of Oklahoma female songwriters that includes Kierston White, Kaitlin Butts, Camille Harp and others. Her experiences flocking with the Songbirds inspired the title track for “Wilder Side” as well as Sampson's rollicking “Holy Mother,” which features Harter's harmony vocals. “I kind of wrote ‘Wilder Side' for my alter ego. I have some girlfriends that we have alter ego names so if we go out and get a little too drunk and do something stupid we can blame it on them and it's not us,” Sampson said, laughingly revealing that her alter ego is named “Curtis.” “ ‘Holy Mother' is the more rowdy drinking song that was sort of influenced by Ali Harter and those girls in Tequila Songbirds. We would get together and play and just have way too much fun. … and I feel like for the first time I have an awesome group of women musicians in my life.  “I feel like in the past, there has been some cattiness and competition — and it's bound to happen — but it feels like the group of women that are playing right now have each others' backs and we're friends. And that's how it should be because we're all doing the same thing. We should all help each other out.”    Singing of ‘heartbreak and highways' Although she started recording “Wilder Side” last winter — “it took longer than I wanted it to; it always does,” she said — Sampson penned the 10 original songs during a yearlong span when she went through a breakup and moved back to Oklahoma from Arkansas. She said the album's overarching theme is “heartbreak and highways.” “Definitely the older I get, the more truthful I get. I feel like when I first started writing I would just make up stories or write about something that didn't affect me,” said Sampson, who has been penning songs and playing guitar since she was 15. “When you think about John Moreland, for example, he's brutally honest to the point where sometimes you're like, ugh, it's heartbreaking. But that's what's touching. That's what, to me, a song should be, so I try to do that.” Moreland lent his mournful vocals to her solemn road song “Highway Rider” and offered encouraging feedback on her achingly vulnerable track “Take Me Home with You.” She said she was happy to have so many Oklahoma musicians as well as so many music fans help her with “Wilder Side," the second Kickstarter-funded album Sampson has produced. More than 200 fans pledged a total of $14,000 for the album and her fall acoustic EP “33.” It's really truly the only way that I could have done it. It's so expensive. Even doing it in somebody's tiny house, there's so many different components to it,” she said. “It was such an amazing feeling to know that those people … are willing to support me so much.” During the yearlong process of capturing her “Wilder Side,” Sampson also found encouragement on the festival circuit. With some money her mother gave her for Christmas, she applied to several festival songwriting contests last year, placing in two and winning the 2015 Chris Austin Songwriting Competition, part of the MerleFest Music Festival in Wilkesboro, N.C., with her acoustic anthem “Wild Bird," one of the tracks from "Wilder Side. “I had Peter Rowan, one of the greats of bluegrass, literally sitting where you are, judging, taking notes the whole time I was playing. That part was terrifying. But it was awesome,” she said. “I feel like singing is the most natural thing I can do. It's just always been easy for me. But I've worked really hard at playing guitar and writing songs, so it's awesome to be recognized.” “We'd have to wait for trains to go by and planes and (there was) no vocal booth or anything like that. It was just all out in his living room.  … We're sitting on his couch and like Ali Harter came over a few times to sing backing vocals and brought her daughter. It was definitely relaxed, and I think made it easier, at least for me. Less stressful.” Flocking with Songbirds Both Sampson and Harter are counted among the Tequila Songbirds, a revolving collective of Oklahoma female songwriters that includes Kierston White, Kaitlin Butts, Camille Harp and others. Her experiences flocking with the Songbirds inspired the title track for “Wilder Side” as well as Sampson's rollicking “Holy Mother,” which features Harter's harmony vocals. “I kind of wrote ‘Wilder Side' for my alter ego. I have some girlfriends that we have alter ego names so if we go out and get a little too drunk and do something stupid we can blame it on them and it's not us,” Sampson said, laughingly revealing that her alter ego is named “Curtis.” “ ‘Holy Mother' is the more rowdy drinking song that was sort of influenced by Ali Harter and those girls in Tequila Songbirds. We would get together and play and just have way too much fun. … and I feel like for the first time I have an awesome group of women musicians in my life.  “I feel like in the past, there has been some cattiness and competition — and it's bound to happen — but it feels like the group of women that are playing right now have each others' backs and we're friends. And that's how it should be because we're all doing the same thing. We should all help each other out.”    Singing of ‘heartbreak and highways' Although she started recording “Wilder Side” last winter — “it took longer than I wanted it to; it always does,” she said — Sampson penned the 10 original songs during a yearlong span when she went through a breakup and moved back to Oklahoma from Arkansas. She said the album's overarching theme is “heartbreak and highways.” “Definitely the older I get, the more truthful I get. I feel like when I first started writing I would just make up stories or write about something that didn't affect me,” said Sampson, who has been penning songs and playing guitar since she was 15. “When you think about John Moreland, for example, he's brutally honest to the point where sometimes you're like, ugh, it's heartbreaking. But that's what's touching. That's what, to me, a song should be, so I try to do that.” Moreland lent his mournful vocals to her solemn road song “Highway Rider” and offered encouraging feedback on her achingly vulnerable track “Take Me Home with You.” She said she was happy to have so many Oklahoma musicians as well as so many music fans help her with “Wilder Side," the second Kickstarter-funded album Sampson has produced. More than 200 fans pledged a total of $14,000 for the album and her fall acoustic EP “33.” It's really truly the only way that I could have done it. It's so expensive. Even doing it in somebody's tiny house, there's so many different components to it,” she said. “It was such an amazing feeling to know that those people … are willing to support me so much.” During the yearlong process of capturing her “Wilder Side,” Sampson also found encouragement on the festival circuit. With some money her mother gave her for Christmas, she applied to several festival songwriting contests last year, placing in two and winning the 2015 Chris Austin Songwriting Competition, part of the MerleFest Music Festival in Wilkesboro, N.C., with her acoustic anthem “Wild Bird," one of the tracks from "Wilder Side. “I had Peter Rowan, one of the greats of bluegrass, literally sitting where you are, judging, taking notes the whole time I was playing. That part was terrifying. But it was awesome,” she said. “I feel like singing is the most natural thing I can do. It's just always been easy for me. But I've worked really hard at playing guitar and writing songs, so it's awesome to be recognized.” ” - Brandy McDonnell

NewsOK

In modern society, inventiveness doesn’t always guarantee success or approval; the same can be said about modern music. What does seem to be winning is creative expression within the comfortable confines of familiarity; and Carter Sampson is winning.  The Oklahoma City-based singer/songwriter, has penned another inspired full-length album with Wilder Side, set for a Jan. 12 release.  Once again, Sampson teamed up with producer/multi-instrumental whiz Travis Linville to concoct a collection of 10 songs, seven of which are previously unreleased (“See the Devil Run”, “Highway Rider” and “Wild Bird” appeared on the digital-only EP, Thirty-Three). Overall, Wilder Side is a nominally stylized album musically, which allows Sampson’s intoxicating vocal lines and commanding phrases to steer the songs to and from their brushes with brilliance. It’s not to say this solo record is without contribution – fellow Okies like John Moreland, Ali Harter, Gabe Mor and Ryan Jones contributed to the album – but Linville carefully utilized the talented team to leave plenty of leeway for the real star to shine. The ‘queen of Oklahoma’ makes no hesitation in hashing it out, kicking off the album with the title cut which is part confessional and all professional. We learn how about a gypsy soul and staying up all night, and how long drives fuel the fires deep within. Many of those sentiments are shared with another stand-out cut, “Run Away”, which shows Sampson longing to escape to a place where happiness sustains itself without having to rely upon work or worry.  “Holy Mother” is a rocking tribute to rowdy gangs of ladies who run the town on any given night, with a chorus that begs, “Don’t let any of us drink gasoline,” because such caustic cocktails could lead them to conceding to the wants and ways of the ‘guitar man’ (and, subsequently, perhaps the procreation of an unexpected band member).  Get your copy of Wilder Side today at www.cartersampson.bandcamp.com, or by attending any one of her CD release concerts. Get complete tour information at www.cartersampson.net.   ” - Joe Mack

Currentland Magazine

The self-proclaimed Queen of Oklahoma is returning with a new album Jan. 12. Oklahoma City singer-songwriter Carter Sampson's fourth effort is titled "Wilder Side." Here's your first chance to hear the album's closing track, "See the Devil Run. The song is based on Sampson's actual visit to Rev. Al Green's church in Memphis. I talked to Sampson on the phone Wednesday about the lively service. It was everything I had ever imagined and more," Sampson said. "There's soul to it. There's life to it. Sampson said she grew up going to a Methodist church in Oklahoma and wanted more from the service's music. An 80-year-old singing bravado wasn't cutting it for her. Maybe she watched "The Blues Brothers" when she was too young. Green's service was like a dream choir," Sampson said. "Everyone had a huge voice. I remembered wanting to be Aretha Franklin when I was younger."  Green spent time introducing himself to strangers in the crowd during his service. He even pointed at Sampson and asked where she was from.  Oklahoma," she said. Boomer Sooner!" he replied. See the Devil Run" is just a taste of Sampson's new album. Another highlight is "Medicine River," which takes advantage of the dreamy production style of producer Travis Linville. Other musicians making guest appearances on the album include fellow Oklahomans John Moreland, Ali Harter, Ryan Jones, Gabriel Mor and Joe Mack. Andy Adams and Denise Cullen also helped co-write two of the albums songs, “Everything You Need” and “Medicine River. Wilder Side is available for pre-order via Sampson's Bandcamp site. Those who pre-order the album will receive a digital download code of the album. Physical copies will ship on or before Jan. 12.  ” - Nathan Poppe

NewsOK

RDN Exclusive: Carter Sampson's 'Wilder Side'   December 22, 2015 OKLAHOMA CITY – For her fourth studio album, Oklahoma City-based singer/songwriter Carter Sampson turned to fans and friends to help her hash out Wilder Side. The album, which is slated for an official release on Jan. 12, 2016, features 10 original compositions, and marks her second collaboration with producer Travis Linville. Other musicians making guest appearances on the album include fellow Oklahomans John Moreland, Ali Harter, Ryan Jones, Gabriel Mor and Joe Mack. Andy Adams and Denise Cullen also helped co-write two of the albums songs, “Everything You Need” and “Medicine River”, respectively. VIDEO: Wilder Side As its title alludes, Wilder Side is a no-holds-barred showcase of songs written from behind the windshield, over the road, inside the bottle, and from the heart. The title cut proves the possessor of such an angelic voice is not invincible with her bleeding, beating heart. Other songs offer different perspectives, like the unhinged joy of the unknown in “Run Away”, or the vulnerable surrender of the solemn “Take Me Home With You”. The album’s closer, “See the Devil Run”, is an autobiographical account inspired by a visit to the Rev. Al Green’s church in Memphis for Sunday services, which no doubt had the demons dashing for the doors. While the themes explored on Wilder Side have been covered by Sampson and her predecessors before, it’s her stark realization and buttery translation of the experiences themselves in such a sheer, accessible and memorable way that will propel the songstress to the front of the craft’s conversation.  Sampson raised over $10,000 via Kickstarter, reaffirming this award-winning songwriter’s latest venture is indeed ‘listener supported.’ Donors at various levels received perks from autographed merchandise and hand-written lyric sheets to house concerts and private performances. Wilder Side is now available to pre-order via the artist’s Bandcamp site, http://cartersampson.bandcamp.com. Those who pre-order the album will receive a digital download code of the album. Physical copies will ship on or before Jan. 12, 2016. ” - Jeremy Scott

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